Telstra launches outbound voice calling on Google Nest devices, iPhone eSIM support


Telstra says it is the first mobile carrier in the world to support voice-activated outbound calls on Google Nest and Home devices.

The telco said that its mobile customers could link up to six mobile services to a compatible Google Assistant device and synchronise contacts. A Google Mini, Home, Home Max or Hub can be used to dial by contact or business name, or call a particular number.

Google Assistant can be trained to recognise up to six individuals’ voices using its Voice Match feature.

Telstra will begin to roll out the service to customers from today.

“Voice technology is growing rapidly in Australia with smart speakers in over 1.35M Australian households, and two-thirds of Australian owners admitting to using their smart speaker daily,” said Telstra connected devices and accessories principal, Steve Dance.




10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something anonymously on Internet.

Fraudsters deepfake CEO’s voice to trick manager into transferring $243,000



It’s already getting tough to discern real text from fake, genuine video from deepfake. Now, it appears that use of fake voice tech is on the rise too.

That’s according to the Wall Street Journal, which reported a voice-fraud crime that cost a company $243,000.

In March, criminals sought the help of commercially available voice-generating AI software to impersonate the boss of a German parent company that owns a UK-based energy firm.

They then tricked the latter’s chief executive into urgently wiring said funds to a Hungarian supplier in an hour, with guarantees that the transfer would be reimbursed immediately.

The company CEO, hearing the familiar slight German accent and voice patterns of his boss, is said to have suspected nothing, the report said.

But not only was the money not reimbursed, the fraudsters posed as the German CEO to ask for another urgent money transfer. This time, however, the British CEO refused to make the payment.

As it turns out, the funds the CEO transferred to Hungary were eventually moved to Mexico and other locations. Authorities are yet to determine the culprits behind the cybercrime operation.

The firm was insured by Euler Hermes Group, which covered the entire cost of the payment. The names of the company and the parties involved were not disclosed.

AI-based cyberattacks are just the beginning of what could be major headaches for businesses and organizations in the future.

In this case, the voice-generation software was able to successfully imitate the German CEO’s voice. But it’s unlikely to remain an isolated case of a crime perpetrated using AI.

On the contrary, if social engineering attacks of this nature prove to be successful, they are bound to increase in frequency.

As the tools to mimic voices improve, so is the likelihood of criminals using them to their advantage. By feigning identities on the phone, it makes it easy for a threat actor to access information that’s otherwise private and exploit it for ulterior motives.

Back in July, Israel National Cyber Directorate issued warning of a “new type of cyber attack” that leverages AI technology to impersonate senior enterprise executives, including instructing employees to perform transactions such as money transfers and other malicious activity on the network.

The fact that an AI-related crime of this precise nature has already claimed its first victim in the wild should be a cause for concern.

Last year, Pindrop — a cybersecurity firm that designs anti-fraud voice software — reported a 350 percent jump in voice fraud from 2013 through 2017, with 1 in 638 calls reported to be synthetically created.

To safeguard companies from the economic and reputational fallout, it’s crucial that “voice” instructions are verified via a follow-up email or other alternative means.

The rise of AI-based tools has its upsides and downsides. On one hand, it gives room for exploration and creativity. On the other hand, it also allows for crime, deception, and nearly (unfortunately) damn competent fraud.


10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something anonymously on Internet.

How Mozilla is crowdsourcing speech to diversify voice recognition


The immediate future of human-machine interaction lies in voice control, what with smart speakers, home appliances, and phones listening for commands to do our bidding.

But voice assistants like Amazon’s Alexa and Apple’s Siri represent their overwhelmingly white, male developers leading to gender and racial bias. For example, if you have an accent, or your native language is something other than English, chances are you won’t get what you’re asking for.

To solve this, Mozilla, a free software community, created “Common Voice” in 2017, a tool that crowdsources voices as a dataset to diversify AI and represent the global population, not just the west.